Articles Tagged with Trust

What Types Of Trusts Are Useful In Protecting Retirement Plans?

There are a number of schools of thought here. In our practice, we feel a revocable living trust is not a good vehicle to handle retirement plans. Often these are not drafted with the appropriate language to comply with the IRS service regulations to be what’s called a “see-through trust”. A Retirement Plan Trust is specifically drafted to comply with the service regulations and meet all the criteria so that if this trust is designated as the beneficiary, you will be able to preserve the tax deferral for those named beneficiaries to get the stretch advantages.

Continue reading

No, it does not. It transfers by beneficiary designation. Much like life insurance that goes to the individual named in the policy, the retirement plan goes to the individual named on the beneficiary designation in the plan document. If you don’t have a beneficiary designated or the individual that you designated is deceased, the account value can wind up in your probate estate; and if this happens, the only choice is that all the taxes are due right away, and there is significant inflexibility. But in general, it will avoid probate.
Continue reading

When talking about families and inheritance, studies show that while financial assets are important, family values and family history take the driver’s seat. Most people treasure family stories and life lessons regardless of their age, financial situation, or race. A simple case would be comparing the reactions of siblings on two topics: a family legend or a new car. Chances are, the stories of the new car will stop after one month while the family stories will continue to be told and enjoyed for decades. This is because family stories, family values, and life lessons learned by members of the family are integral to its legacy.

safeDepositBoxA very recent study though shows that millennials think of inheritance as a “bonus” but expect to get that bonus – and are expecting large sums of up to $100,000. However, they are willing to lower that figure because many parents are already helping their adult children financially with student loans and other expenses.

An article published on www.Marketwatch.com reported that one in three Americans will “blow their inheritance” because they are not prepared to handle it. In fact, those who inherit money tend to spend it quickly and one-third end up with negative savings two years later.

Parents have a responsibility to teach their children money management so any windfall they get will be spent wisely. Inheritance, while a “bonus,” should not be just “fun money.” In today’s economy, a $1,000,000 inheritance does not even guarantee a comfortable retirement for a couple beyond their fifties. Continue reading

The young often think of themselves as invincible in the sense that in their protected world, nothing bad can happen to them, especially with their parents around. Studies show that over 90% of adults under 35 do not have a will, providing reasons like:young-family

  • It’s not necessary.
  • It’s too complicated for me to deal with right now.
  • It’s too expensive.
  • My parents will take care of all that.
  • I won’t need it for a long time anyway.
  • It takes too much time

According to surveys done by USA Life Expectancy, adults aged 15 to 34 rarely die from medical causes but the figures are high for accidents, poisoning, suicide, homicide, and injuries. This suggests that for young adults, death often comes unexpectedly. Continue reading

Asset protection planning, no matter what anyone tells you, was never meant to be a tax avoidance tactic. Asset protection planning is a legal option for planning your wealth in advance of a claim or the threat of a claim.retirement trust

Asset protection planning is used to improve your bargaining position, make options available for settling claims, and avoid litigation – not to escape paying your taxes or debts or hiding your wealth from certain people.

And while there are some who insist asset protection planning is a form of cheating, this is only a perception because the truth is: There are some who try to use this option to cheat and lie, but it does not make it right and eventually they get caught.

Continue reading

1221950_to_sign_a_contract_1 sxchu notify.jpgEstate planning is an essential tool to ensure your money and other assets are transferred pursuant to your wishes upon your death. If you are bequeathing money to a loved one in your will, it is important to keep in mind that large sums of money can be quickly and easily squandered. Financial advisers who work with individuals who suddenly receive a windfall say the money often vanishes quickly. Proper estate planning and the use of wealth transfer tools can ensure the financial well being of your family is protected. Continue reading

Over the years, we’ve discovered that many people make a BIG mistake, catapulting their assets and loved ones right into the probate court system. Most of our clients want to avoid probate court because it has a reputation for being expensive, time consuming, stressful952313_gavel – and public, meaning anyone anywhere can see who got what and how to contact them. Beneficiaries may become victims to nosey neighbors, predators, and unscrupulous “charities.”

Q: What’s the one mistake that causes all these problems?

Continue reading

No Estate Tax, No Worries?

Will I Owe Estate Tax?

You may have read recently a great deal about the debate regarding estate tax making it appear as if avoiding estate tax is the most important reason why individuals and couples need to prioritize estate planning. However, this is simply not the case. In fact, with the current federal estate tax exemption of $10.68 million for married couples and $5.43 million for individuals, estate tax is not an issue for the majority of individuals who need to begin the estate planning process.

Top Reasons Why You Need an Estate Plan

If avoiding estate tax is not a priority for you in the estate planning process, one or more of the following common reasons for estate planning probably apply in your case. Continue reading

Estate Planning for Baby Boomers1133299_mum_2 sxchu

According to financial planners interviewed for an article in USA Today, Baby Boomers are neglecting or simply ignoring the importance of estate planning. They are more focused on their retirement and focused on whether they will have sufficient income to provide for their needs and to do what they want during retirement. Ignoring the need to have an estate plan is not just a problem for Baby Boomers — no one really wants to think about their own death. People tend to put off estate planning because they think, “I will do that later.” Unfortunately for some, “later” is too late.

Why Do Baby Boomers Need to Have an Estate Plan?

Estate planning is an important part of your retirement plan. Your estate plan is more than telling your loved ones what you want to do with your property and financial assets after your death. Your estate plan also allows you to take care of your minor children, or grandchildren, and it allows you to make decisions about your medical care in the event you are unable to do so in the future.

What Estate Planning Tools are Available? Continue reading

Estate Planning – A Process, Not an Event

You have signed all of your estate planning documents and, if your plan includes trusts, completed their funding. You sit back, relax, and enjoy the peace of mind that comes with completing that task. But don’t bask in that feeling for too long—estate planning is an ongoing process, not a one-time event.

Why Your Estate Plan Will Need to Evolvesigning

Your estate plan is designed in light of what is known at the time; a snapshot, if you will, of you, your family, your financial situation and the tax laws as they existed and were anticipated to change in the future at the time it was prepared. All of those things do change during your lifetime, and often in ways that were not anticipated. When the unanticipated happens, your estate plan will need to change, to adjust.

It is unreasonable to expect that a basic will-based plan created when you were a newlywed living in an apartment would still be all you need when you have children, a home, and a business. Life’s curve balls – such as a divorce, a loved one who has special needs, or changes in the tax laws can also make plan adjustments advisable.

Events that Trigger Changes to Your Estate Plan

Maintaining an estate plan has been compared to maintaining an automobile. Both need periodic attention if you expect them to perform the way you want when you need them. While a car will have time and mileage checkpoints for servicing, your estate plan will have event checkpoints and should be checked periodically, too.

Generally, any significant change in your personal, family, financial or health situation, or a change in the tax laws should prompt an estate plan review. The following list can be used as a guide, but is by no means all-inclusive:

Personal and family changes: Continue reading