Articles Posted in Asset Protection

pexels-photo-684387-300x198Do you remember that episode of the U.S. version of “The Office” where Michael Scott thinks he can seek bankruptcy protection from his creditors simply by walking into the office and stating, “I declare bankruptcy!” Obviously, that is not how bankruptcy works. Yet, when it comes to estate planning, some people operate under a similar misunderstanding of the law; they think they can shield their assets from their creditors by placing it in a trust.

How the Law Treats Revocable Living Trusts

Now, there are ways to use trusts as a legal means of asset protection, but when it comes to a revocable living trust–the most common form of trust used in estate planning–that is not the case. A revocable living trust is a means of avoiding probate, not a way to avoid paying back your creditors. Continue reading

pexels-photo-315788-300x225Estate planning is only effective if it includes all of your assets. In most cases this is not a big deal. Major assets like your home have a deed that clearly establishes legal title. Other liquid assets such as a brokerage account are maintained by a trusted third party that must follow certain regulatory standards.

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family-business-300x200Family-owned businesses are often the most complex type of asset to deal with in estate planning. There are multiple stakeholders to consider. On the one hand, you may want your family to continue enjoying the benefits of owning the business. But you may also want to make sure the business continues to run in a professional manner.

Asking a Fiduciary to Take on Multiple Roles can Lead to Conflicts Continue reading

how-to-secure-a-mortgage-after-bankruptcy-slideshow-300x120One of the biggest estate planning concerns that we hear about from parents is that they are reluctant to leave a potentially sizable inheritance to their financially irresponsible adult children. This raises an interesting question that you probably have not considered in connection with your own estate plan: What happens if my child files for bankruptcy just before I die? Will my estate be forced to pay off my son or daughter’s creditors? Continue reading

Which Of These Powerful Secrets Could You Use To Build Your Ideal Estate Planning Legal Program

  • Keep your estate settlement simple;
  • Avoid the court-supervised Probate process when you die;

monopoly-capital-gains-tax-300x225Let’s face it, most families simply won’t have to worry a lick about the federal estate tax. That’s because about 99% of unmarried people don’t have an estate that exceeds $5.49 million. And more than 99% of married couples don’t have a combined estate of $10.98 million. So, for most families, have no worries about trying to avoid the 40% federal estate tax but fail to spot this unintended tax issue of the Capital Gains Tax.

But almost every family who engages in estate planning has assets that have appreciated in value. That means there is the potential for capital gains tax at the federal level when those appreciated assets are sold.

Example: Let’s say Dad bought stock in ABC Co. for $5 per share over the years. Now, that Dad is 76 years old, ABC Co. stock sells for $60 per share. That means that there is $55 of gain in each share of stock that Dad owns. If Dad sells the stock during his lifetime, he’ll get hit hard with a capital gains tax.

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We’ve talked to many Wisconsin families about things that they had done in an effort to protect their money from all being sucked up by the nursing home costs which can exceed $100,000 annually. Lots of mistakes are being made by people who don’t truly understand the intricacies of the Wisconsin Long Term Care Medicaid law and regulations. While you won’t get all the answers in this post, you’ll learn what some of the common mistakes are. So… here are options that just don’t work. Continue reading

According to estimates, if you are 61 years old now, the average annual cost of long-term care when you are 79 years old is likely to be: 1) over $180,000 per year for nursing facility care; 2) over $69,000 per year for assisted living care; and, 3) over $80,000 per year for in-home care.

According to the US Government Administration on Aging, “70% of the people who turn 65 can expect to use some form of long-term care during their lifetimes.” Also, according to the Administration on Aging, “one-third of today’s 65 year-olds may never need support, but 20 percent will need it for longer than 5 years.”

So, based upon the skyrocketing costs of long-term care, and the odds that two-thirds of us may someday need long- term care, should we plan ahead? The answer is YES.

When talking about families and inheritance, studies show that while financial assets are important, family values and family history take the driver’s seat. Most people treasure family stories and life lessons regardless of their age, financial situation, or race. A simple case would be comparing the reactions of siblings on two topics: a family legend or a new car. Chances are, the stories of the new car will stop after one month while the family stories will continue to be told and enjoyed for decades. This is because family stories, family values, and life lessons learned by members of the family are integral to its legacy.

safeDepositBoxA very recent study though shows that millennials think of inheritance as a “bonus” but expect to get that bonus – and are expecting large sums of up to $100,000. However, they are willing to lower that figure because many parents are already helping their adult children financially with student loans and other expenses.

An article published on www.Marketwatch.com reported that one in three Americans will “blow their inheritance” because they are not prepared to handle it. In fact, those who inherit money tend to spend it quickly and one-third end up with negative savings two years later.

Parents have a responsibility to teach their children money management so any windfall they get will be spent wisely. Inheritance, while a “bonus,” should not be just “fun money.” In today’s economy, a $1,000,000 inheritance does not even guarantee a comfortable retirement for a couple beyond their fifties. Continue reading

Asset protection planning, no matter what anyone tells you, was never meant to be a tax avoidance tactic. Asset protection planning is a legal option for planning your wealth in advance of a claim or the threat of a claim.retirement trust

Asset protection planning is used to improve your bargaining position, make options available for settling claims, and avoid litigation – not to escape paying your taxes or debts or hiding your wealth from certain people.

And while there are some who insist asset protection planning is a form of cheating, this is only a perception because the truth is: There are some who try to use this option to cheat and lie, but it does not make it right and eventually they get caught.

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