Articles Tagged with IRA

old-age-164760_640-300x200“The federal government ushered in a slew of progressive programs during the Great Depression with the aim of helping the most downtrodden Americans. Few of these programs have held the progressive banner higher than Social Security.”

Social Security was created to ensure that Americans with low lifetime incomes would have an adequate retirement income, so aging Americans would not live in dire poverty. Continue reading

pexels-photo-164474-300x200“If you are looking to pull cash from your 401(k) plan or traditional IRA without getting hit with a penalty, the IRS will allow you to do it.”

This is a move of last resort. You’ll need to do all the research to be sure this will not do more damage to your retirement savings than absolutely necessary. You are allowed to take a series of equal payments from your IRA or a 401(k) account, without being subject to a 10% penalty—but only under certain circumstances, advises CNBC in the article “How to tap your retirement savings without getting hit with a stiff penalty—but only if you absolutely have to.”

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time“Though retirement can be a fulfilling time in people’s lives, it can also be a stressful one. This especially holds true, if you fall victim to the following mistakes, so be sure to avoid them at all costs.”

Most people spend their entire working lives dreaming of retirement. However, when they get there, it’s a new and strange world without fixed schedules or routines. If you make any of these mistakes, reports The Motley Fool in the article “4 Retirement Planning Mistakes You Probably Don’t Even Realize You’re Making,” you might be surprised to find yourself working again! Continue reading

investment-3247252_640-300x200“Most Americans enter retirement age with access to Social Security benefits. Many people also have Individual Retirement Accounts, including those that were funded by transferring money from workplace 401(k) plans.”

One trick to a successful retirement is to make your Social Security benefits coordinate optimally with your Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), says AZ Central in the article “Retirement planning: Connecting the dots between Social Security and IRAs.”

Not everyone takes a step back to think this way.  However, it is a smart thing to do. With proper planning, your retirement could lead to better results for your investments and a better decision on when to take Social Security benefits. Continue reading

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Retirement

“Many seniors may be more focused on their bucket lists, than worrying about having their financial affairs in order.”

Seniors should be having some heart-to-heart discussions with their spouses and loved ones about their wishes concerning their assets and their final days, according to Intermountain Catholic in “Retirees Have Several Financial Issues to Consider.” After a loved one dies, family members are often left dealing with the expenses of their medical care and funeral. To be left to deal with these issues while grieving, adds another layer of heartbreak. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Retirement plans, including IRAs, 401Ks, 403Bs, and 457As, are not controlled by common estate planning documents such as wills and revocable living trusts. They transfer to heirs by a beneficiary designation. So whoever is named as the beneficiary when you initially signed that plans document, is the person that will receive the value in the account when you pass away.
This lack of control sometimes can be problematic, especially when an individual retirement saver has designated a beneficiary and has forgotten to keep those designations up to date. The plan documents will control where the money goes and your last will and testament will have no effect because beneficiary designations avoid probate. Your retirement plans will also not be controlled by a revocable living trust because the plans are not trust property; they are individual property.

Is The Title of A Retirement Plan Going To Be Transferred To A Trust Upon Someone’s Death?

No, what happens is that beneficiary is contacted by the custodian. For example, you have an IRA in a brokerage account. You pass away, and hopefully, you have designated beneficiary’s, for example, your spouse as the primary beneficiary. The broker or your financial advisor calls up your spouse and says, “You are the designated beneficiary of this retirement account there is $100,000 in it and you have a few options for distribution. What would you like to do? Would you like to pay the income tax obligation now, cash it out and do whatever you wish with the money, or do you wish to inherit this IRA and stretch out the tax obligation over your lifetime keep it as your own retirement fund?” Now there are different rules as to whether spouses inherit or if children inherit, but that’s effectively what happens when a custodian handles the transfer to the designated beneficiary.

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