Articles Tagged with power of attorney

pexels-photo-534204-300x166Eight attorneys representing individuals and organizations connected to the late artist Robert Indiana, creator of the iconic “LOVE” sculpture, are asking that future hearings be held in closed sessions to protect people’s privacy and the value of some of his works of art, reports Press Herald in a recent article titled “Attorneys want hearings on the value of Robert Indiana’s estate held behind closed doors.”

Atty. James Brannan, who represents Indiana’s estate, is requesting information in a testimonial hearing to better determine the estate’s value. Continue reading

pexels-photo-748780-300x207Selecting someone to make health care decisions for you when you are unable, requires a great deal of trust and is considered by many to be the most important estate planning tool, according to The Daily News in “Choose Health Care Power of Attorney Carefully.”

The Durable Health Care Power of Attorney—HCPOA—is similar to the general POA in that both can be used to provide your representative with either very broad or very limited acting authority.  However, they are also very different. The HCPOA can be drafted to retain its effectiveness, while you are alive and after you pass away. Continue reading

pexels-photo-630835-300x206Estate planning is important for anyone over the age of 18. It does matter if you have a small or large bank account, if you are a parent or not, or if you are old or young. A typical estate plan includes a will, durable power of attorney and advance health care directive, says the Pensacola News Journal in the article “Let’s Talk About: Estate Planning.”

What makes up an estate? Your home, cars, investments, bank accounts, retirement accounts and any belongings you own. Your will, which is also known as a “Last Will and Testament”, is a way to create a legally binding document with instructions as to who should get these possessions when you have died. Your will should also include directions about who will care for your children, if they are still minors under the legal age of adulthood. Continue reading

While planning for a catastrophic accident is something we may never want to think about, creating a power of attorney for someone to act in our best interest in the event that we become incapacitated is an important aspect of estate planning. Even in cases in which we make a full recovery, we still may need someone to take care of our finances or act on our behalf for a period of time while we recover.

In Wisconsin, these legal arrangements are called “durable powers of attorney” and allow someone to name another individual as the “attorney in fact” to make important healthcare decisions when someone faces an end of life scenario. Some of the scenarios where someone may have to exercise their durable power of attorney over another could be cases where someone is on a respirator or has severe brain damage and  unlikely to make a recovery.

Wisconsin law 155.01 et seq. Allows individuals to create a durable power of attorney for: